D-03.05 Get & Make Simple-Present  3rd-Person Statements & Yes/No Questions
D-03.05 Get & Make Simple-Present  3rd-Person Statements & Yes/No Questions
D-03.05 Get & Make Simple-Present  3rd-Person Statements & Yes/No Questions
D-03.05 Get & Make Simple-Present  3rd-Person Statements & Yes/No Questions

Work/Life English

D-03.05 Get & Make Simple-Present 3rd-Person Statements & Yes/No Questions

D. APPLY GRAMMAR

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Parts One to Three of Chapter 7 (the Simple Present: -s Forms: “People”) of WorkLife English Life Skills, Workbook 1

13 pages

Who It’s For: (Teachers & Helpers of) Beginning Language Learners      

Why It’s Useful: In systematic grammar instruction, even beginners (ought to) encounter Third-Person Singular Verbs or phrases that include the functional -(e)s (in contrast with base verbs without endings). This segment not only presents the forms in Simple-Present Statements, Questions, & (Short) Answers. Because third-person sentence subjects are often words for relatives or other kinds of people, Possessives (nouns & adjectives) are covered, too. Competencies include Recognizing Family Relationships, Job Titles & Work Descriptions; Asking & Telling about People; Understanding & Using Postal & Telephone Information.

What You’ll Do: 

[1] With others, have the conversation in the Strip Story on page 92. (Have learners) Identify third-person singular sentence subjects + tell the matching main (after auxiliary) verbs.  Identify other sentence elements.  Look at the Grammar Box.

[2] For Exercise A on page 93, (help learners) note that different sentence structures can convey comparable meanings, as in “SUBJECT + VERB” = “SUBJECT + is + NOUN. After drawing lines to match sentences, you/they might create equivalent sentences with vocabulary of their/your own. Exercises E-*G on the next 3 pages will draw your/their attention to other features of the grammar.  

[3] For the Presentations, Explanations, Exercises, and Activities in Parts Two & Three on pages 97-98 & 99-103, use any procedures that have proven effective in the past. Add steps to check out learners’ knowledge and abilities, to stimulate interest, to make use of cooperation and competition, and to go “Beyond the Text” in stimulating ways that work.